Health Literacy Position Statement

 

Health Literacy Position Statement - PDF
Popular 230.32 KB
12/07/2017 01:59:19

 


The health literacy level of many Australians does not permit them to access, interpret, communicate and use health information. This can affect their access to effective health care and health improvement activities.
As a health promotion charity, Health Care Consumers’ Association of the ACT Inc. (HCCA)

  • supports the Australia Commission for Safety and Quality in Health Care (ACSQHC) definition of health literacy,
  • acknowledges that some health consumers may need support while they gain the skills and confidence to improve their health literacy, and
  • undertakes to become a health literate organisation.

 

HCCA’s Commitment to health literacy

HCCA will work
1. with consumers and health services providers to identify their information and training needs
2. to build the capacity of consumers, carers and community members in a number of ways, including the development of resources, delivery of information sessions and skills based workshops
3. with staff of health services to enhance their ability to communicate clearly to meet the needs of consumers and carers.
4. with staff of health services to standardise the development and provision of health information
5. with the ACT Government and local health services to develop and implement policies, training programs and systems to improve the health literacy of people living in Canberra and its surrounds
6. to become a health literate organisation.

 

 

HCCA Position Statement on Climate Change and Health

 

 

Climate Change and Health
Popular 79.22 KB
12/12/2016 00:00:26

As a health promotion organisation, the Health Care Consumers’ Association of the ACT Inc. (HCCA) recognises that climate change presents profound risks to health. Climate change will affect the health of many people in many nations, and will affect some people more than others. For example, rising temperatures increase the risk of heat-related death and illness and broaden the distribution of some communicable diseases, particularly those that are water borne and/or vector borne. Changes to rainfall bring droughts and floods, which can result in disease and death. Food production changes can lead to hunger and malnutrition in vulnerable populations.i Research shows that ‘some population groups are particularly vulnerable to the health effects of climate change, whether because of existing socioeconomic inequalities, cultural norms, or intrinsic physiological factors. These groups include women, young children and older people, people with existing health problems or disabilities, and poor and marginalised communities.’ ii


In recognition of the health impacts of climate change, HCCA acknowledges that:

 

  • Climate change can cause serious and irreparable harm to the environment and human health. Urgent action by governments and corporations in cooperation with the community is essential to mitigate climate change and to adapt where necessary. We endorse Australia adopting a carbon emissions reduction target of 50% by 2020 and 80% by 2050 as proposed by the Public Health Association of Australia and the Australian Climate and Health Alliance.iii
  • People and our health must be central to climate change policy and action. People need good health, a good environment and a strong community to flourish. A Climate Change policy should ensure that these basic human needs are met. It must reduce the risks to our health that climate change presents, build social cohesion and ensure food and water security for all people.
  • Concerns about climate change may result in uncertainty, stress and mental ill-health. Assistance for people with jobs in industries which will need to change is an important structural adjustment strategy, specifically including retraining and relocation. Resilience and hope are key human resources and supporting access to mental health services is also important in a time of change. 
  • Climate change mitigation and adjustment strategies can deliver positive health outcomes. The community should be made aware of the negative health impacts of climate change and the potential positive health outcomes from climate change mitigation and adaptation.iv 
  • Addressing climate change requires connected solutions. The inter-relationships between infrastructure design, health and climate policy must be acknowledged and addressed. Solutions must be developed co-operatively and transparently by government, business, academic and other institutions in partnership with communities.

 

REFERENCES & FURTHER INFORMATION:

 

  • Armstrong, F. Joint Submission to Climate Change Authority Special Review. Public Health Association of Australia and Climate and Health Alliance (march 2015) Available at: https://www.phaa.net.au/documents/item/363
  • Smith, K.R., et al., “Human health: impacts, adaptation, and co-benefits.” In Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability. Part A: Global and Sectoral Aspects. Contribution of Working Group II to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change., C.B. Field, et al., Editors. 2014: Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA. Pp. 709-754.
  • Watts, N., et al., “The Lancet Commissions: Health and climate change: policy responses to protect public health”. The Lancet, 386.10006 (Nov 7, 2015): 1861-1914. P6.
  • World Health Organization (WHO), Protecting health from climate change: connecting science, policy and people. 2009: Geneva Switzerland.
  • World Health Organization (WHO), Quantitative risk assessment of the effects of climate change on selected causes of death, 2030s and 2050s, S. Hales, et al., Editors. 2014: Geneva, Switzerland. p. 1.

 

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Smith, K.R., et al., Human health: impacts, adaptation, and co-benefits. , in Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability. Part A: Global and Sectoral Aspects. Contribution of Working Group II to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change., C.B. Field, et al., Editors. 2014: Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA. p. pp. 709-754.

ii Watts, N., et al., The Lancet Commissions: Health and climate change: policy responses to protect public health. The Lancet, 2015

iii Armstrong, F. Joint Submission to Climate Change Authority Special Review. Public Health Association of Australia and Climate and Health Alliance (march 2015) Available at: https://www.phaa.net.au/documents/item/363

iv Australian Medical Association,Climate Change and Human Health - 2004. Revised 2008. Revised 2015 Accessed:https://ama.com.au/position-statement/ama-position-statement-climate-change-and-human-health-2004-revised-2015